• Tacana indigenous people benefit from protecting caiman

    Tacana indigenous people benefit from protecting caiman

    In Bolivia

    Selling sustainably hunted caiman skins to Gucci has increased the household income of the Tacana indigenous people of Bolivia over 530%, providing a tangible incentive to protect this once endangered crocodile
  • Resettlement works for livelihoods and tigers

    Resettlement works for livelihoods and tigers

    In India

    Helping local people living uncomfortably with tigers to be justly compensated for their voluntary out-migration has protected tigers and substantially improve the wellbeing of participating families.
  • Ranger patrols save forest elephants

    Ranger patrols save forest elephants

    In Central Africa

    WCS led widllife surveys in areas with and without active ranger patrolling, demonstrated that well managed national parks are effective in protecting elephants, and great apes.
  • Locally managed marine areas increase fish abundance

    Locally managed marine areas increase fish abundance

    In Madagascar

    Securing the rights of local families to fish, exclusively, in their tradition waters, reduced destructive gear use, increased fish biomass, and secured the livelihoods of fishers.
  • Tiger populations recovering under effective protection

    Tiger populations recovering under effective protection

    In Thailand

    WCS engagement has brought additional Government spending for tiger conservation, reduced threats and increased tiger numbers
  • Chimpanzees living in the corridors forests of the Murchison-Semliki Landscape

    Chimpanzees living in the corridors forests of the Murchison-Semliki Landscape

    In Uganda

    Deforestation in corridors between national parks in Uganda is declining as farmers adopt WCS conservation farming practices
  • Protecting indigenous rights reduces deforestation

    Protecting indigenous rights reduces deforestation

    In Cambodia

    Helping the indigenous Bunong people to secure legal title to their land prevented 140km2 of forest from being cleared, protecting habitat for endangered gibbons.
  • Dramatic recovery of Southeast Asia’s waterbirds

    Dramatic recovery of Southeast Asia’s waterbirds

    In Cambodia

    Offering secure jobs, WCS converted egg collectors into nest guardians increasing endangered waterbird numbers 15-35 fold in 10 years, creating the largest waterbird colony in Southeast Asia.
  • Absent for 80 years, bears once more roam

    Absent for 80 years, bears once more roam

    the eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains and Great Basin

    WCS sound science helped reduce conflicts with people allowing bears to expand back into Nevada
  • Avoiding deforestation and securing livelihoods

    Avoiding deforestation and securing livelihoods

    In Makira, Madagascar

    By co-managing Makira National Park WCS is reducing global carbon emissions, conserving endemic forest plants and animals, and protecting the cultural identity and wellbeing of our local community partners.
  • Translating policy into practice for Manta Rays

    Translating policy into practice for Manta Rays

    In Indonesia

    Helping the Indonesian government to enforce their closure of the unsustainable trade in Manta Rays has resulted in a sharp decline in prices and a move by fishers and traders into other businesses.
  • Reducing livestock losses, reduces tiger poaching

    Reducing livestock losses, reduces tiger poaching

    In Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, Indonesia

    Mitigating tiger-livestock conflict, improving wildlife crime intelligence, and expanding effective ranger patrols prevents poaching and stops retaliatory killing of tigers.
  • Targeted patrols by park rangers are a lifeline for Grauer’s gorillas

    Targeted patrols by park rangers are a lifeline for Grauer’s gorillas

    In Eastern DR Congo

    Surveys show that WCS conservation efforts resulted in a 64% increase in gorilla numbers between 2000 and 2015.
  • Protecting bears and people

    Protecting bears and people

    In the Adirondacks

    To ensure people and bears co-exist in the Adirondacks, WCS staff changed backpacking policies and practices.
  • Improved protected area management to reduce poaching

    Improved protected area management to reduce poaching

    In Congo

    A co-management agreement with the Republic of Congo allowed WCS to secure new funding, increase the effectiveness of ranger patrols, and protect wildlife populations in the Nouable-Ndoki National Park.
  • Resettlement works for livelihoods and tigers
  • Improved protected area management to reduce poaching
  • Targeted patrols by park rangers are a lifeline for Grauer’s gorillas
  • Protecting bears and people
  • Tiger populations recovering under effective protection
  • Chimpanzees living in the corridors forests of the Murchison-Semliki Landscape
  • Tacana indigenous people benefit from protecting caiman
  • Dramatic recovery of Southeast Asia’s waterbirds
  • Translating policy into practice for Manta Rays
  • Locally managed marine areas increase fish abundance
  • Absent for 80 years, bears once more roam
  • Ranger patrols save forest elephants
  • Reducing livestock losses, reduces tiger poaching
  • Protecting indigenous rights reduces deforestation
  • Avoiding deforestation and securing livelihoods

Strengthening Management To Reduce Threats

To track changes in the level of threats to wildlife and their habitat and to evaluate the effectiveness of management efforts we are increasingly building capacity of protected areas agencies, ranger-based programs and community ecoguard patrols to implement SMART – the Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool. SMART is a suite of best practices aimed at helping protected area and wildlife managers better monitor, evaluate and adaptively manage patrolling activities. Its powerful software application improves the ability of protected area agencies and other community-based natural resource management programs to combat poaching and other illegal activities. SMART allows us to measure changes in the level of threats across a landscape or seascape and helps us to target conservation actions where threats are greatest.

Copyright 2016-2017 by Widlife Conservation Society

WCS, the "W" logo, WE STAND FOR WILDLIFE, I STAND FOR WILDLIFE, and STAND FOR WILDLIFE are service marks of Wildlife Conservation Society.

Contact Information
Address: 2300 Southern Boulevard Bronx, New York 10460 Phone Number: (718) 220-5100