• Payments for conservation work for wildlife

    Payments for conservation work for wildlife

    In Cambodia

    Knowing that PES has huge potential as an incentive for conservation, WCS tested three different schemes in Cambodia to evaluate their impact on conservation and human wellbeing.
  • Targeted patrols by park rangers are a lifeline for Grauer’s gorillas

    Targeted patrols by park rangers are a lifeline for Grauer’s gorillas

    In Eastern DR Congo

    Surveys show that WCS conservation efforts resulted in a 64% increase in gorilla numbers between 2000 and 2015.
  • Tacana indigenous people benefit from protecting caiman

    Tacana indigenous people benefit from protecting caiman

    In Bolivia

    Selling sustainably hunted caiman skins to Gucci has increased the household income of the Tacana indigenous people of Bolivia over 530%, providing a tangible incentive to protect this once endangered crocodile
  • Resettlement works for livelihoods and tigers

    Resettlement works for livelihoods and tigers

    In India

    Helping local people living uncomfortably with tigers to be justly compensated for their voluntary out-migration has protected tigers and substantially improve the wellbeing of participating families.
  • WCS is supporting our indigenous communities partners to restore and protect river turtles in Yasuní National Park
  • Absent for 80 years, bears once more roam

    Absent for 80 years, bears once more roam

    the eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains and Great Basin

    WCS sound science helped reduce conflicts with people allowing bears to expand back into Nevada
  • Tiger populations recovering under effective protection

    Tiger populations recovering under effective protection

    In Thailand

    WCS engagement has brought additional Government spending for tiger conservation, reduced threats and increased tiger numbers
  • Protecting indigenous rights reduces deforestation

    Protecting indigenous rights reduces deforestation

    In Cambodia

    Helping the indigenous Bunong people to secure legal title to their land prevented 140km2 of forest from being cleared, protecting habitat for endangered gibbons.
  • Reducing livestock losses, reduces tiger poaching

    Reducing livestock losses, reduces tiger poaching

    In Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park, Indonesia

    Mitigating tiger-livestock conflict, improving wildlife crime intelligence, and expanding effective ranger patrols prevents poaching and stops retaliatory killing of tigers.
  • Trophy turkeys encourage forest conservation

    Trophy turkeys encourage forest conservation

    In Guatemala

    Connecting communities in Guatemala to US sport hunters has allowed WCS to generate financial incentives for local families to protect the largest block of neotropical forest outside of the Amazon.
  • Chimpanzees living in the corridors forests of the Murchison-Semliki Landscape

    Chimpanzees living in the corridors forests of the Murchison-Semliki Landscape

    In Uganda

    Deforestation in corridors between national parks in Uganda is declining as farmers adopt WCS conservation farming practices
  • Locally managed marine areas increase fish abundance

    Locally managed marine areas increase fish abundance

    In Madagascar

    Securing the rights of local families to fish, exclusively, in their tradition waters, reduced destructive gear use, increased fish biomass, and secured the livelihoods of fishers.
  • Communities Restore Degraded Reefs

    Communities Restore Degraded Reefs

    Along the Coast of Kenya

    By helping communities take control of their fisheries WCS is conserving Kenya's coastal reefs and increasing the wellbeing of local fisherman.
  • Garbage company pays to protect people and bears

    Garbage company pays to protect people and bears

    In Montana

    To expand bear friendly lands beyond parks preventing them from getting a taste for trash makes life safer for people and bears.
  • Dramatic recovery of Southeast Asia’s waterbirds

    Dramatic recovery of Southeast Asia’s waterbirds

    In Cambodia

    Offering secure jobs, WCS converted egg collectors into nest guardians increasing endangered waterbird numbers 15-35 fold in 10 years, creating the largest waterbird colony in Southeast Asia.
  • Ranger patrols save forest elephants

    Ranger patrols save forest elephants

    In Central Africa

    WCS led widllife surveys in areas with and without active ranger patrolling, demonstrated that well managed national parks are effective in protecting elephants, and great apes.
  • Mining company pays for conservation

    Mining company pays for conservation

    In Mongolia

    A Private-Public-Partnership brokered by WCS will inject $50 million over 30 years to protected 80,000km2 of habitat for Khulan, goitered gazelle and bactrian camel.
  • Dramatic recovery of Southeast Asia’s waterbirds
  • Communities Restore Degraded Reefs
  • Ranger patrols save forest elephants
  • Absent for 80 years, bears once more roam
  • Tacana indigenous people benefit from protecting caiman
  • Protecting indigenous rights reduces deforestation
  • Resettlement works for livelihoods and tigers
  • Trophy turkeys encourage forest conservation
  • Reducing livestock losses, reduces tiger poaching
  • Garbage company pays to protect people and bears
  • Targeted patrols by park rangers are a lifeline for Grauer’s gorillas
  • Tiger populations recovering under effective protection
  • Locally managed marine areas increase fish abundance
  • Mining company pays for conservation
  • Payments for conservation work for wildlife
  • Chimpanzees living in the corridors forests of the Murchison-Semliki Landscape

Saving Species

To assess and report changes in the status and distribution of wildlife species, WCS measures occupancy – the presence or absence of a species within a landscape or seascape or across its geographic range. Monitoring species’ area of occupancy is the most cost-effective and most easily interpreted approach for tracking population trends in both terrestrial and marine species. WCS research shows a positive relationship between area of occupancy and abundance, and that conservation actions can positively influence area of occupancy. Advantages of applying occupancy methods are that they: 1) are scientifically defensible; 2) generate easily visualized and interpreted results; and 3) are methodologically agnostic, that is, with careful design, occupancy data can be generated from a broad range of data collection methods.

Copyright 2016-2017 by Widlife Conservation Society

WCS, the "W" logo, WE STAND FOR WILDLIFE, I STAND FOR WILDLIFE, and STAND FOR WILDLIFE are service marks of Wildlife Conservation Society.

Contact Information
Address: 2300 Southern Boulevard Bronx, New York 10460 Phone Number: (718) 220-5100